We think therefore we are

Thinking is plural. It involves subject (thinker) and object (idea). Reality is in the relationship between; it is not concrete or material. “I think, therefore I am” is incomplete. Better would be – I think ABOUT, therefore there is existence.
This isn’t my insight, but variously Einstein’s (relativity), Bion’s (the mind as apparatus to think pre-existing ideas), Whitehead’s (Process and Reality) and Buber’s (Ich Ind Du). If there is a “singularity”, then it is outside the space-time in which we swim and spawn. As we Christians express it – God is “the Word, existing beyond time”. Others say the same thing in different ways (Nirvana ). 

What we experience is dis-integration. Alone we are: alone. Point-less. Together and between us lies the truth. Indeed materiality is chimera: we reflect each other, flowers of the same plant. Reality is in the honouring of the God in You, in I-Thou rather than I-It.

“World is crazier and more of it than we think,

Incorrigibly plural. I peel and portion

A tangerine and spit the pips and feel

The drunkenness of things being various.” 

Louis MacNeice

A Psalm for Sunday

What lies beyond SpaceTime is incomprehensible in human terms, but we’re human and can only speak our language.  (Now, we see through a glass darkly). Understanding comes through  parable and metaphor. Two thousand years ago God was described as male, as father. We created God in our image. We haven’t, though, confined or proscribed God to that image. Jesus might now easily describe God as female, our Mother. Better though, for me anyway is,  the description as – the Word existing beyond time.

“I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” This always seemed to me inconsistent with Christ’s compassion for all humanity, particularly the lost and the lonely.  It came to me today however that He was signifying that all humanity, that all through His action, is saved. His sacrifice changed the course of history. Nirvana is possible for all of us.

Humanism and Copernicus

Tuesday (19th February) is the 540th anniversary of Copernicus’ birth. He was, of course, the mathematician who posited that we are centred around the Sun and not the Earth. It brought him into conflict with the Church. It is our EGO’s natural assumption that WE are critically important and that all meaning revolves around us; ridiculous when contemplating celestial orbits and the expanding universe. Surely equally naive when addressing the meaning of existence – (that we humans are the centre of everything).

Humanism derives all meaning in us, we, humans and our fulfilment. In this philosophy we are the equivalent of the Earth; but it appears to me that our species on this planet with our narrow senses are only a part of something bigger. With it’s nucleus elsewhere. Effectively, for me, meaning is centred around a philosophical “Sun” rather than on our “Earth”.

Indeed, rather than emphasising the importance of ego – what happens if we accept its insignificance?

One description of life’s journey is the progress from the baby’s unboundaried “I am everything”, to the realisation of our separated triviality. The rich compensation can be the revelation of the depth and infinity of love that we are in our entangled whole.

Nirvana? The truth shall set you free. Let us be spiritual Copernicans.